Accessible August 

It’s been a very busy week! The best part about it was that my sister, Aoibhinn (pronounced Eeving), is visiting and she and I were able to do lots of things together. That’s her in the coral jacket, above. You see, she has ME, or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and she was really nervous about her ability to participate in the activities I had booked or planned, or stay the course once on them. 

Aoibhinn does really well at managing her condition, but she has to be very careful or she can end up in a major crash. She struggles with tiredness and pain all the time (sore joints, headaches) but finds that sea swimming helps her cope mentally, so she was up for one of the things we planned to do together, our Dawn Swim and Pilgrimage with Gormú. We met Conor and Celine, and two other participants at Castlehaven and started off by walking the short way up to the Holy Well, where we heard of St Barrahane. Readers may remember Conor from the Placenames post.

Next came the swim. While Aoibhinn opted for a short immersion, I surprised myself by swimming all the way to Faill Dic, with encouragement from Conor, and the lovely safety valve of a float if I needed it. Breakfast was so welcome – porridge, fruit and hot tea made by Celine and Conor (below) – while we listened to more stories, all set around the cove we were in. It was a fantastic experience – I highly recommend it!

The Ellen Hutchins Festival and Heritage Week are both in full swing this week, so there are any god’s amount of things to choose from. We concentrated on botany and butterflies during the week and ended with stained glass and history yesterday. 

Micheline Sheehy-Skeffington and Nick Scott led us through the Glengarriff Woods. While this walk involves an uphill section, the pace is easy because it involves lots of stopping to talk about the plants we encounter along the way. We loved Nick’s descriptions of the forest environment, and all the layers that make up the plant life from the canopy down. And we were riveted by Micheline’s focus on the Arbutus (AKA the Strawberry Tree), a rare tree that occurs only here and in the Iberian Peninsula. 

Micheline is investigating her theory that it may have come with the Bronze Age miners who came to exploit the rich copper resources of West Cork and Kerry. Her recent article in Archaeology Ireland sparked my interest and I was thrilled to be able to go along on this walk with her.

The photograph above illustrates the challenges in tracking Arbutus trees – they grow on cliffs and in inaccessible places.

Our Wednesday walk was organised by the Cork Nature Network and was led by my friend Damaris Lysaght, a real local expert in plants and butterflies. And as if that wasn’t enough, it was at Three Castle Head, one of the most beautiful spots in Ireland and a place dripping with history

Once again, although this walk involved picking our way through long grasses and scrambling over rocks, the pace was slow, with frequent stops to ooh and aah over butterflies and hear Damaris talk about their habitats and plant requirements. Some of the plants were so tiny that we had to see them through a hand lens to really appreciate them.

We had a rest day on Thursday, and on Friday it was time for Seaweed and Sealing Wax 2. This was the second production masterminded by Karen Minihan, based on the correspondence between Ellen Hutchins and Dawson Turner. See Robert’s post from last year for an account of Seaweed and Sealing Wax 1. This year, we were joined by the poet, Laura McKenna and the botanical artist Shevaun Doherty. That’s Shevaun surrounded by audience members in the top photo of this post, while Laura is in the photo below.

While Karen and I led the audience through the letters, Laura read a selection of poems that responded to Ellen’s life and work, and Shevaun worked away on painting a piece of seaweed, explaining her process to the audience at one point. 

At the end, Madeline Hutchins, Ellen’s great, great, grandniece, showed us some of Ellen’s books and letters. As with last year, we were under a tent in the grounds of Sea View House Hotel, right next door to where Ellen herself had lived in the opening years of the nineteenth century. 

We finished the week with a trip to Timoleague, where I was booked to give two stained glass talks at the Church of the Ascension Open House. This is part of a huge community effort to save and safeguard the fabulous mosaics in this church and I am always thrilled to be a part of it. Take a look at this video by the Rev Kingsley Sutton, Touching Heritage, to get an excellent overview of the whole project.

The church is truly one of West Corks hidden gems, and the fund-raising effort needs all the help it can get. In between the talks, we were whisked off to lunch at a fabulous private house right on the sea. Nice work if you can get it!

So – it’s been an incredibly busy week of flowers, talks, and butterfly hunting (above) and I am feeling it now. But all of our activities were  accessible to Aoibhinn, with time to rest in between, or go for a lovely dip locally. So – if there’s anybody out there who wonders if you would be able for a botany walk or a dawn swim and ‘pilgrimage’ – no need to be intimidated by a title or a description when the pace is leisurely and, as Aoibhinn found, there’s always a handy rock to sit down on for a while.

8 thoughts

  1. Thank you for the lovely video about the Church of the Ascension. I am so sorry not to have seen it when I was in Timoleague. The Church of the Nativity has some beautiful stained glass windows too – Harry Clarke studio. Father Hickey struck me as a lovely man and a true priest. And wonderful memories of Jane and her choir from the Cork International Choral Music Festival – they were so uplifting, and all of the way from Tasmania. Life was so simple before covid.

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  2. Such a lovely post – the videos and pictures! Thanks for sharing and so glad you had such a fantastic week with Aoibhinn – please pass along my greetings!

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  3. Hi Finola,

    My name is Michelle Collyer. I live in the US and have a connection to Ballydehob via my dear friends Stephen and Sarah Canty. Roaringwater Journal is a lovely part of keeping that connection strong and I look forward to its arrival each Sunday. Today, however, inspired me to write a deeply emotional and heartfelt thank you.

    Like your sister Aoibhinn, I too have ME/CFS. This summer, it’s become severe. I’ve had to close my business and spend most days in bed. As I transition into this new normal, I’m experiencing fear for the first time in my life. Primarily, fear that I won’t be able to travel anymore and, specifically, that I won’t be able to scramble around West Cork and Kerry with my husband and the Cantys ever again.

    And then, your Accessibility August post hit my inbox. I want you to know that you have lifted the heaviest stone in my heart and given me great hope for a future within the place I love most on earth. Your work has touched me and calmed the dreadful fear that’s been wracking me.

    Thank you, Finola. I hope we’ll meet the next time I’m in Ballydehob.

    With love from Lopez Island, WA (USA)

    -michelle

    ps: Please tell your sister she’s shown me how to live with ME/CFS and still satisfy a curious mind. To completely overwhelm her, tell her she’s my hero. ??

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  4. It’s never a dull moment and I am mostly impressed that you could swim and speak! And wasn’t the link with arbutus and copper mining fascinating? What a fantastic variety of experiences, I bet Aoibheann enjoyed every moment.

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