Code Red

A joint post by Robert and Finola

By Rossbrin Cove, after Storm Darwin

By Rossbrin Cove, after Storm Darwin

Weather apWe looked back recently and counted the number of posts both of us have done on the subject of the weather, and decided not to do any more on pain of boring our readership to death. But this week Met Eireann issued a rare Code Red warning and their direst predictions came true. The Southwest of Ireland was pounded by hurricane force winds, the like of which many people had never experienced before. Storm Darwin wreaked havoc in our corner of the world.

We were lucky! Our power was off for several hours, but our house is set up so we can still stay warm, run water, and cook. We lost a few more trees, including two that fell over the road, blocking access. Our terrific landscaper, Thomas, chainsawed them off so that at least cars could get by. Trees that came down in our neighbour’s property severed our telephone cable and we have been told that it could be ten days before this is fixed – so we have no landline and no internet. We use our cell phones to connect whenever we can in cafes in town or in friends’ houses, but reception has been spotty all week due to storm damage.

We're almost out of trees now in the haggard

We’re almost out of trees now in the haggard

Many of our neighbours have not been so fortunate and are still without power. For some this can also mean no water and no way to cook. The County Council has issued a warning to boil drinking water amid fears that water supplies have been contaminated. All over the countryside crews are out clearing away trees and restoring cables. Two young men were swept to their deaths by huge waves on the north side of the Sheep’s Head. Another man, part of a telephone repair crew, has died while working on the high wires. Roads and towns flooded although this time the storm surges did not coincide with high spring tides so the water damage was not as bad as it had been earlier in the year.

Boats blown down

Boats blown down

And what do we do in Ireland when the storm hits? We hunker down next to the fire in a warm dry pub, of course, and sing our hearts out! This week, an old friend of Robert’s arrived from Cornwall with his Lifeboat Choir – singers associated with lifeboat stations around Cornwall. The group has developed a long-term relationship with a similar group here in West Cork and this was their annual visit. So we found ourselves holed up in a hospitable establishment in the village of Ballinadee, with musicians and singers from both sides of the Irish Channel, singing and playing and hooting and cheering the night away, and then driving home beneath a clear brilliant moonlit sky that looked as if it had never held a drop of rain.

Cornwall comes to West Cork

Cornwall comes to West Cork

Life in West Cork is nothing if not variety!

This post has been brought to you courtesy of a friend’s internet. Lack of internet and a planned trip to Clare will disrupt the regular posting schedule over the next couple of weeks but normal service will resume as soon as possible.

20 thoughts

  1. Hello Finola Finlay and Robert Harris, i´ m happy to find your wonderful journal of roaring water bay! and thank you for the actually picture of rossbrin cove and the other with the boats. i was there 2 times the last years and i love this place. There was the stand from Ann with the fruits, vegetables and flowers. Where do you live there? i was at the end of the street 😉 by Carola and Nick Addey. Sorry my english is not the best. I´m so afraid for you and the land and the people and animals because of this big big storms this winter. i hope it´s over now and you have enough help there to build up again and i wish you a nice start in the spring! best wishes and love from germany, cologne *Zen*

    Like

    • Hello Zeninto! Lovely to get your comments – sorry it has taken so long to respond. We live on the opposite end of the Cove to where you were – up by the windmill. The storms did a lot of damage but everyone is fine and it looks like spring is finally coming! All the best from Rossbrin.

      Like

  2. Glad you and Robert are safe. Didn’t realize that Ireland was having such storms. Here in the U.S.A. we have had very cold weather and snow storms. Hoping spring will
    come soon. All our best. Mary

    Like

  3. In serious drought/rationing conditions over this way … seems winter has decided to pass us by. The resevoirs and lakes are down 30-50%, with the wineries crying in their beer over being shut out of state water resources … and that’s California for you. Would still rather be home in Foilnamuck in a raging storm, than over here in 29c/85f costal weather. Yep … video clips would surely be nice!

    Like

  4. So good to hear that you have survived the unimaginably awful weather conditions Congratulations and I do hope that normality will return soon to so much of devastated Europe and America. In contrast Australia is having severe drought and bush fires !
    Cheers from Ann

    Like

  5. I can’t be the only one who wants to see you add some Video clips to your blog. Those evenings in the pub look like a wonderful time!
    Glad you survived the winds, we’ve seen quite a bit on the Canadian news about all the winds and flooding in England, but not much about your neck of the woods.
    Take Care.
    Rod and Sylvia

    Like

  6. Wow – we thought we had it bad here in Chagford but I guess you were the first objects that the mighty winds met and they expressed their displeasure at being slowed down !

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s